More than 120,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated during WWII

The Architect's early rendering for the proposed Memorial

The Memorial's Crane Centerpiece with office building background

Visitors to the Memorial listen during a presentation

The Crane symbolically tears free the barbed wire that encircled the camps

The twin cranes fly free taking with them the barbed wire of unjust arrest

The Memorial's name is enscribed on the granite stone that lines the entrance

Names of over 800 Japanese American soldiers killed in action during WWII are carved into the Wall of Honor

More than a dozen dentention camps were established to imprison Japanese American citizens

A friend of the Memorial clears the area of debris

Speakers at the 2012 Veteran's Day event pose for pictures at the Memorial with Secretary Norman Y. Mineta

The Memorial hosts many events, including Swearing In Ceremonies such as this one

Current Events of Interest

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Well, tell the Japanese American experience as lived during World War II. The story will be a summertime treat at the memorial for kids and adults alike!

Using movement and animal characters, "The Little Crane and the Long Journey" tells the incredible World War II story of bravery and adventure, inspired by the true story of the 442nd Regimental Combat Unit. The story will be told in a fable that can be understood by children and the entire event will be enjoyed by adults.

More info can be found here!
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TENTATIVE DATES
(all performances will be done at the Memorial)

Past Events of Interest


Freedom Walk - 2015

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The 17th Annual Cherry Blossom Freedom Walk, an official event of the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, DC will be held on Saturday, March 28, 2015 at the National Japanese American Memorial, rain or shine. Check-in begins at 9:00AM. Nen Daiko Japanese Taiko drummers of Ekoji Temple, VA will perform at 9:30AM and the program will begin at 10:00AM.

This year’s keynote speaker will be Ms. Catherine Mitrano, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Resolution Management at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Also on the program will be the Japanese Minister of Economics and Development Tamaki Tsukada from the Japanese Embassy in Washington, DC.
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The Cherry Blossom Freedom Walk is a historical and cultural event to raise awareness about the Japanese American experience during World War II and to highlight the vigilant role that American citizens must continue to play in preserving the Constitutional rights of all Americans. The Memorial was built as a lasting tribute to the more than 33,000 Japanese American soldiers who served with great distinction in the U.S. Military. The Memorial also pays tribute to the more than 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry who were unjustly relocated in American confinement sites during World War II and is also a testament to our nation’s greatness that it does not fear to acknowledge its mistakes.

Admission is FREE and registration is greatly appreciated. Donations are gladly accepted and will be used to defray expenses for the 2015 Freedom Walk.
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The National Japanese American Memorial Foundation is proud to sponsor the Smithsonian Institution 2015 Day of Remembrance Program. This year’s program will include a screening of David Ono's (news anchor with Los Angeles ABC-7 Eyewitness News) Emmy-award winning documentary The Legacy of Heart Mountain. (more info)
The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by University of Massachusetts professor Dr. Franklin Odo with panelists :


  • Film producer David Ono;
  • Former Department of Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta, featured in the film;
  • Alice Takemoto, a Nisei imprisoned in Jerome War Authority Center in Arkansas;
  • Paul Takemoto, author of Nisei Memories: My Parents Talk About the War Years; and
  • Shirley Higuchi, chairperson of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation.

The program also includes a live performance by spoken-word artist G. Yamazawa.
The 2014 Cherry Blossom Freedom Walk was held on April 5th, 2014 at the National Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism. On what turned out to be a day of excellent weather and magnificent Cherry Blossoms some 200 guests arrived for the annual event.

Among this year's speakers were Ambassador Sasae of Japan, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and others.

The keynote address was delivered by Ms. Jodie Bernstein. Ms. Bernstein was the Chair of the Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. She spoke of the journey to obtain redress for those Japanese Americans incarcerated during WWII. The text of her remarks can be
found here.

Photos from this year's Freedom Walk were contributed by Bruce Hollywood. The gallery of the photos is
available here.

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    The 2013 NJAMF Award Dinner Gala was held on November 2nd, 2013 at the Marriott Wardman in Washington DC, from 6:00 PM until 10:00 PM.

    Information Innovators, Inc., proudly sponsored this year's Gala. Ms. Sachi Koto served as the Gala's Mistress of Ceremonies and the awardees are:
    - Adm. Mike Mullen (USN Ret.), (accepted by Capt. Fred Mingo USN Ret.)
    - Mr. Terry Shima,
    - Mr. Craig Uchida, Ph.D., and
    - Secretary Norman Mineta.

    Pictures from the event are courtesy of Joe Shymanski.

    Thanks to all involved in making this year's event a success.
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    The Congressional Gold Medal Tour makes it's way to De Young Museum in San Francisco. (all photos courtesy of David Louie)

    On June 29, 2013 in San Francisco at the de Young museum, the original Congressional Gold Medal honoring the Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers was unveiled.  The National Veterans Network and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service are sharing the story of the veterans and the Medal in a 7-city national tour.

    Addressing the guests were:  Mr. Colin Bailey, Director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; The Hon. Nancy Pelosi, Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives; Daphne Kwok, Chair of President Obama's Advisory Commission on Asian American & Pacific Islanders and NJAMF  Board Member; Mr. Konrad Ng, Director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center; and 442nd Veteran Lawson Sakai.  Also in attendance was Maya Soetoro-Ng, sister of President Obama.

    Twenty-seven veterans from the 100th, 442nd and MIS were in attendance including 100 year-old Roy Matsumoto of Merrill's Marauders. 

    Ms. Kwok delivered remarks at the event and her comments can be
    found here.
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    The National Japanese American Memorial Foundation is pleased to be the lead sponsor of the Smithsonian Institutions Asian Pacific American Center's presentation of “Fighting for Democracy: Who is the ‘We in ‘We the People’?” This compelling stage performance about the real-life experiences of seven Americans who bravely fought for equality, freedom, and justice overseas and at home during World War II.

    Thursday, June 6, 2013
    More Info . . .
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    The National Japanese American Memorial Foundation is proud to be the Premiere Sponsor of the East Coast Asian American Student Union's Youth Leadership Week in Washington, DC. The events will take place in DC from May 28th through May 31st.

    During this week students of all ages will convene from all over the country to the heart of Washington, DC and will be exposed to the advocacy and public policy arena.

    Consistent with our education and outreach program NJAMF will host a workshop session on May 29th. The workshop will bring to life the experiences of several Japanese Americans personally effected during WWII and thoughts on the redress of this national wrong.

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    “Here we admit a wrong. Here we affirm our commitment as a nation to equal justice under the law.”
    — President Ronald W. Reagan, upon signing the Civil Liberties Act of 1988

    Welcome to the NJAMF Site


    For the United States, the Second World War began when the Empire of Japan attacked American armed forces at Pearl Harbor in what was then the Territory of Hawaii on Sunday, December 7, 1941. A little more than two months later – in what was eventually described as acts born of wartime hysteria, racism, and weak political leadership - President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The Order resulted in the internment of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry into 10 relocation camps scattered through more desolate regions of the western United States.

    Most of those interned were American citizens. But despite these injustices, thousands of Japanese Americans voluntarily joined the U.S. armed services forces to help win the war in Europe and the war in the Pacific. More than four decades later, the United States Government – in the historic Civil Liberties Act of 1988 approved by Congress and the President -- formally apologized for the personal justice denied by the mass internment.

    Soon thereafter, Japanese American veterans of the War led an effort to create a national memorial in the Nation’s Capital to honor the military and civilian patriotism of these individuals and the communities in which they struggled. An ultimate quest was to lift the unjust stigma of shame placed upon the backs of these loyal Americans. The National Japanese American Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC on Federal land on November 9, 2000.

    The Memorial honors the heroism and sacrifice of Japanese Americans who fought and died for their country. The Memorial tells the story of Japanese Americans who supported their nation on the home front. But the Memorial does not tell merely a Japanese American story. It tells an American story of patriotism, perseverance and posterity. It is a story about the rights of every American. It is a story of triumph over tragedy.

    Throughout our presentation, we'll be mindful of the purpose of the Memorial and our mission. You'll have an opportunity to learn more about how the Memorial was conceived, designed and constructed. You’ll meet the people whose dedication and effort brought it into being, and hear some of the many stories of those Japanese American patriots to whom it is dedicated. But most importantly, you'll be provided the important opportunity to participate in the Foundation’s ongoing efforts to share our story…and your rights.

    Proud Sponsor of the ecAAsu 2014 Youth Leadership Events